The Cloisters of Basilica di San Giovanni

Cloisters are always a wonderful part of visiting large cathedrals and churches. This one was especially nice as it had a little exhibit organised along the walls. One of these stones is apparently a stone on which people played dice for Jesus’ clothes. Ok.

Also pretty flowers.

asker

Anonymous asked: When did you go to the dungeons because none of what you said actually happens. Just wondering.

It was June 28, 2014. I just looked again though and it is actually the London Bridge Experience that we did, which is maybe slightly different? Thanks for pointing this out!

One of Rome’s many obelisks, set in the Piazza di San Giovanni. Across from the Battistero Lateranesne; an octagonal baptistery. Gorgeous mosaics and an interesting octagonal interior.

The stone on the outside is so unassuming; while I was trying to find this place I accidentally wandered into the parking lot of a military compound. I was very quickly informed of my mistake by the attendant. Whoops!

Basilica di San Giovanni in Laterano

This church was gorgeous, and absolutely massive. The offered audio guide was quite good, if infused with a little too much extra drama. The various chapels and the altar were beautiful, and the inside of the dome featured two massive pipe organs.

The front porch of the basilica was cool stone, refreshing in the heat, and featured beautiful bronze doors.

One of the many churches where one is asked to dress with arms and legs covered. There are even people selling scarves all over the place for tourists caught out!

The Sacred Steps/Scala Sancta in Rome

These steps have an odd history. Apparently the staircase that Jesus walked up in Pontius Pilate’s palace in Jerusalem. People climb the steps on their knees to reflect on the suffering Jesus endured.

I debated about climbing the steps myself; as seen in the photo, they were very crowded, and I also hesitate on the line between ‘tourist’ and ‘pilgrim’. But in the end I did climb the steps—on my knees—and I am glad I did. it was an interesting experience and faith reflection.

There is a pretty chapel at the top, and alternative stairs you can climb in the conventional way.

Millennium Bridge and the Tate Museum

The Tate Museum is a museum of modern art, set up in an old factory. It is the ugliest building on the outside, with a big smokestack; it is really modern inside, with tons of escalators.

The art is…interesting…  Modern art has never been my favourite, but some of the stories behind things were cool, and we got a free audio guide with the London Pass (huzzah audio guides).

We did a pretty whirlwind tour through, but it is a free museum, so I can also go back later.

While I was in London with my friends I went to this.
Now, I like haunted houses, etc. I am a chicken, but I usually survive.
I DID NOT LIKE THIS!!
Holy jeez this was intense. Claustrophobia in full swing, gore galore, and just weirdness.
The first bit was ok; a little gory, but more like what I expected. There were actors talking about life in London around the London Bridge through the years; ya know, Romans, plague, Great Fire, Jack the Ripper, etc. etc.
Then they put us all into a BOX with barely any room, to wait for the actual haunted house bit. We had to hold onto the shoulders of the person in front of us and stick together. I closed my eyes most of the time, but you had to crawl through things, and there were heads hanging from the ceiling that drop on you, and I got squirted by a water hose at once point. Chainsaws and blood and guts flying everywhere. Plus this weird revolving tunnel light show thing that made your head hurt.
IT WAS FREAKING SCARY!
That is all…
Edit: New picture because I accidentally called it The London Dungeon, which is different from what this actually was, which is The London Bridge Experience and Tombs.

While I was in London with my friends I went to this.

Now, I like haunted houses, etc. I am a chicken, but I usually survive.

I DID NOT LIKE THIS!!

Holy jeez this was intense. Claustrophobia in full swing, gore galore, and just weirdness.

The first bit was ok; a little gory, but more like what I expected. There were actors talking about life in London around the London Bridge through the years; ya know, Romans, plague, Great Fire, Jack the Ripper, etc. etc.

Then they put us all into a BOX with barely any room, to wait for the actual haunted house bit. We had to hold onto the shoulders of the person in front of us and stick together. I closed my eyes most of the time, but you had to crawl through things, and there were heads hanging from the ceiling that drop on you, and I got squirted by a water hose at once point. Chainsaws and blood and guts flying everywhere. Plus this weird revolving tunnel light show thing that made your head hurt.

IT WAS FREAKING SCARY!

That is all…

Edit: New picture because I accidentally called it The London Dungeon, which is different from what this actually was, which is The London Bridge Experience and Tombs.

Walkies around London.

My poor friend was sick when she was in London visiting, and to make matters worse we made her walk all over the damn place. But we found some interesting corners of London.

Like these umbrellas outside a restaurant on the South Bank. And this little garden behind St. Paul’s.

These painted book benches are a project to support reading and libraries, and there were apparently a ton of them installed around the city. So pretty!

Inside the Military Museum at the Tower of London.

This museum has actually been around for a long time. So they have these really old horse statues that have the craziest expressions, and some really old exhibits.

Also, crazy dragon made of armour, and this cool art installation of the bullet tracks of guns.

Tower of London, and Tower Bridge, from across the Thames River.

A monument that sits in the place where they did the hangings in the Tower. (I don’t quite get why it is all modern looking?)

And probably the grumpiest Yeoman Warder in existence. Seriously, these guys are really respected military guys who live at the Tower, and one of their side jobs is to do tours. I asked this one for a picture, but he does not look happy! (I mean, I wouldn’t be either, but I am not a Yeoman Warder…) Ah well.